Recent Updates

  1. Potassium

    Are you getting enough potassium in your diet? Potassium helps maintain normal blood pressure by reducing the effect of sodium. About 90 percent of the population in the United States consumes more sodium than recommended with only about 3 percent meeting the recommendations for potassium. Age and racial/ethnic groups have little effect on the amount of sodium and potassium consumed. Research indicates increasing potassium creates a protective effect against hypertension (high blood pressure).
  2. Natural Organic Lawn Care

    More people are asking for information regarding organic lawn care. Many people want to decrease or eliminate the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides in their home lawns. There is concern that some of these products may be harmful to humans, beneficial insects, wildlife and pets. With proper knowledge, the homeowner can use naturally occurring resources to maintain a home lawn without using synthetic products.
  3. Disinfection in On-Farm Biosecurity Procedures

    Since the appearance of recent swine and avian influenza outbreaks in the United States as well as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Europe in early 2001 has caused many livestock owners serious concern; many are continuing to look more closely at their biosecurity plans or their efforts to keep the diseases out of their herds or flocks. Over the years, Extension veterinarians have received many calls regarding which disinfectants to use on shoes, boots, tires or other equipment in order to kill the FMD or influenza virus.
  4. Biosecurity for Youth Livestock Exhibitors

    In the context of livestock production, biosecurity refers to those measures taken to keep disease agents out of populations, herds, or groups of animals where they do not already exist. Biosecurity measures can be implemented on a national, state or herd level. Currently, there is heightened awareness of national biosecurity as the United States attempts to keep highly pathogenic avian influenza, as well as other diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), out of its animal population.
  5. On-Farm Biosecurity: Traffic Control and Sanitation

    In the context of livestock production, biosecurity refers to those measures taken to keep disease agents out of populations, herds or groups of animals where they do not already exist. Biosecurity measures are implemented on national, state and herd levels. Currently, there is heightened awareness of national biosecurity as the United States attempts to keep swine and avian influenza as well as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) out of its animal population.
  6. Biosecurity Fundamentals for Extension Personnel

    The prevention of livestock disease outbreaks is of concern to the entire agricultural community and especially to Extension personnel, practicing veterinarians and service providers, among others. The mass culling of United Kingdom livestock in early 2001 because of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD), and recent outbreaks of avian and swine influenza in the United States have heightened interest by demonstrating the vulnerability of a nation’s animal resources.
  7. Sclerotinia Stem Rot (White Mold) of Soybean

    Sclerotinia stem rot, or white mold, of soybean is a disease most commonly reported in high-yield soybeans in the North Central Region of the United States. Overall disease incidence and severity vary from year to year and from field to field. In Ohio, growers have faced localized outbreaks of this disease every year since 2009. Infection and disease development are favored by wet conditions and cool temperatures (less than 70 degrees Fahrenheit) prior to, during and following the flowering stage.
  8. Soybean Rust

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is one of the most important diseases of soybean in several regions around the world. The pathogen was first identified in Asia but later spread to Africa (1997) and South America (2001). The first report of SBR in the continental United States occurred in 2004, most likely brought from South America by the winds of Hurricane Ivan. It has been proposed that the widespread adoption of soybean as a crop around the world may have contributed in part to this movement.
  9. Tips for Calibrating Grain Yield Monitors—Maximizing Value of Your Yield Data

    Calibrating grain yield monitors at harvest can be discouraging and time consuming for a combine operator. However, improperly calibrated yield monitors can generate erroneous data that becomes useless or difficult to interpret. Taking the time to calibrate a yield monitor properly pays off when it comes time to using yield map data for post-harvest analyses or supporting decisions based on your yield data.
  10. Using Cover Crops to Improve Soil and Water Quality

    This is a literature review of cover crop benefits from Dabney et al. 2001 and Dabney 1996. Cover crop benefits include: soil erosion protection, reduced nutrient leaching, carbon sequestration, weed suppression and integrated pest management. Cover crops protect water quality by reducing losses of nutrients, pesticides and sediment. Only a small percentage of farmers actually plant cover crops because most farmers believe the disadvantages outweigh the advantages.

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